Tagged: WiFi Trends

Will the FCC’s $2 Billion Plan for School WiFi Create More Problems Than It Solves?

WiFi in schools has been happening with much enthusiasm all over the country. So recent news that the Federal Communications Commission will spend $2 billion to boost wireless Internet connectivity in U.S. schools and libraries during the next two years should be a good thing, right?

While FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has called it a “watershed moment” to give wireless access to 10 million kids, give or take, privacy experts are raising a collective eyebrow.

‘Free Social WiFi’ Isn’t Exactly Free

The idea behind the concept of social WiFi is pretty simple: merchants offer free WiFi service to customers who visit their stores in exchange for customers logging into their network using their Facebook or LinkedIn accounts, or by giving the merchant their email address.

But what do you trade in exchange for logging into the merchant’s social WiFi network?

Don’t Be Evil: San Francisco Artist Spoofs Google’s Free WiFi

A San Francisco media artist named Harris David Harris has created a fake public WiFi network that looked very much like the free one that Google offers to its employees who take private shuttles to and from work in Silicon Valley. His “d0ntb33vil” project — which mimics Google’s motto — also serves as his MFA thesis project in the Digital Arts and New Media program at UC Santa Cruz.

Instead of getting Internet access, Google employees saw an image of the sidewalk in front of them.

What the Open Wireless Movement Means for Your Wireless Security

Imagine a world where your smart devices could automatically join dozens of free open wireless networks – and those networks belonged to total strangers. Consumers who want to participate would need to set up openwireless.org as the network name — and those who want to connect to those networks need to search for that name. That’s the bold vision of the Open Wireless Movement, a joint project of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla, Fight for the Future, and other groups.

Hackers at the World Cup: Beware the Risky Free WiFi in Brazil’s Soccer Stadiums

If you are lucky enough to be at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, chances are you will have access to the public WiFi networks set up just for the event. At least half of the 12 World Cup stadiums will have public WiFi available, with over 2,300 access points.

This includes inside the stadiums as well as the areas close by, such as parks, public transit stations, and squares. So that means that not only will those inside the stadium have access to public WiFi, but many thousands of other soccer fans outside as well.

Unfortunately, the World Cup (and its public WiFi) is attracting more than just soccer fans.

WifiForward and the Future of WiFi

According to WifiForward, a group of companies concerned with making WiFi better, we are in for a WiFi crunch in a few years. Having better WiFi connections can only lead to a brighter future, but as we move into this WiFi-centric world, we would do well to keep online security issues in mind.