Tagged: wifi hotspots

wifi safety

Ask the Expert: Am I Safe Using My Laptop in My Hotel Room?

You think you’re safe within the walls of your hotel room, but the minute you log on to the Internet you are potentially exposing yourself to privacy violations, identity theft, and a host of other cybercrimes you can’t even see happening. In this latest monthly installment of Ask the Expert, CEO Kent Lawson focuses on staying safe when you’re browsing online in your hotel room and the real reasons why a hotel cable connection is no safer than its WiFi connection. Ultimately, he says, the only way to protect yourself in hotels, whether using WiFi or a cable connection, is to use a virtual private network.

computer privacy

Information Security: Who’s Looking Over Your Shoulder?

Have you been in an airport lately? While some people travel for leisure to escape always being “connected”, there are others who find it necessary to stay in touch. Here are some recommendations for keeping your personal information safe while on the road.

The Perils of using Facebook on Public WiFi

The next time you to connect to Facebook on an open hotspot, take a second to think about your security. What was intended as a quick log on to update your status or check your account, may have perilous consequence.  You may not realize it, but Facebook users logging on through a public wireless connection are vulnerable.

Online Dating and Pubic WiFi: How Secure Is It?

You never want to share sensitive information like online banking accounts or credit card portals over unsecured public web connections, but the truth is online dating profiles can often contain just as much data as either of those. In fact, your online dating profile—if falling into the hands of a hacker—can cause far more personal safety problems than your banking data. After all, with online banking a thief just gains access to your checking account; with online dating data, a criminal could gain access to your home address, your workplace, any children’s or family members’ names, and more.

Don’t Get Hacked At CES

It’s that time of year again – when more than 150,000 gadget geeks, techies and businesses from around the world descend on Las Vegas for the mother of all trade shows – the International Consumer Electronics Show. With over 3,200 exhibitors previewing and showcasing their high tech products, CES is the perfect place for tech enthusiasts to network. So you’d think it would be safe for attendees to connect their laptops and mobile devices to the event’s public WiFi hotspot.  But you’d be wrong. Like most big events, CES can be a hot spot for hackers.  If you’re going to be there, make sure you don’t become a target.

Q&A: Founder of ‘Savvy Cyber Kids’ on Cybersecurity Best Practices

Because October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, and in part to raise public awareness of the dangers of identity theft, we recently chatted with author and technology guru Ben Halpert. Several years ago he launched Savvy Cyber Kids, a nonprofit that has joined the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s STOP.THINK.CONNECT. campaign’s national network, forming a partnership that will promote cybersecurity awareness to children nationwide. Keep reading to learn why he launched Savvy Cyber Kids and various topics related to keeping kids as safe as possible online.

University of Maryland Professors to Study WiFi Hotspot Behavior

Two University of Maryland professors, David Maimon, an expert in online criminal behavior, and Jonathan Katz, the Maryland Cybersecurity Center director, recently received a $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to study how people access and use public WiFi hotspots.

Find out what the duo plans to do with the funds — including looking into why some users may be assuming that it’s safe to access sensitive information on public WiFi hotspots at “upscale” places.

How Hackers Protect Themselves When Using Public WiFi

Every year, thousands of hackers and security experts descend on Las Vegas for two of the world’s largest annual hacker conventions: Defcon and Black Hat. Security researchers present their latest findings and security exploits.

Keep reading to find out what types of hacking they are doing at these events and ways to protect yourself!