Tagged: Wifi hacking

The Newest WiFi Threat: Cats

Just when you thought it was safe to use WiFi…along comes the latest threat: cats. Wait, cats? Really? Well, that is if the cat comes outfitted with the newest WiFi hacking device, called WarKitteh.

What type of encryption did Coco the cat find on his neighborhood adventures? Click to find out.

Zone Alarm Highlights the Risks of Public WiFi

A shocking two thirds of us (64%) have little or no concern about connection to public WiFi networks, despite the fact that everything we do on these networks can be viewed and stolen by others. Check out a study by Zone Alarm, which highlights three of the biggest risks on public WiFi: man-in-the-middle attacks, rogue WiFi networks, and packet sniffers.

CBS News: WiFi Hotspots ‘Hotbed for Hacker Activity’

In a compelling new video clip, CBS News praises the merits of PRIVATE WiFi and highlights the increasing awareness among security-savvy consumers to protect their data in wireless hotspots. Watch as CBS News’ Jericka Duncan gets her email credentials — including user name and password — literally stolen out of thin air.

Don’t Be Evil: San Francisco Artist Spoofs Google’s Free WiFi

A San Francisco media artist named Harris David Harris has created a fake public WiFi network that looked very much like the free one that Google offers to its employees who take private shuttles to and from work in Silicon Valley. His “d0ntb33vil” project — which mimics Google’s motto — also serves as his MFA thesis project in the Digital Arts and New Media program at UC Santa Cruz.

Instead of getting Internet access, Google employees saw an image of the sidewalk in front of them.

True Story: I Was Hacked on Home WiFi

Do you think your home wireless network is secure? That’s what Barb Angelova thought, until she got the scare of her life. What happened to Barb isn’t unusual. What’s more, it should be a wakeup call for anyone who uses home WiFi.

Hackers at the World Cup: Beware the Risky Free WiFi in Brazil’s Soccer Stadiums

If you are lucky enough to be at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, chances are you will have access to the public WiFi networks set up just for the event. At least half of the 12 World Cup stadiums will have public WiFi available, with over 2,300 access points.

This includes inside the stadiums as well as the areas close by, such as parks, public transit stations, and squares. So that means that not only will those inside the stadium have access to public WiFi, but many thousands of other soccer fans outside as well.

Unfortunately, the World Cup (and its public WiFi) is attracting more than just soccer fans.