Tagged: vpns

WiFi Footprint: Personal VPNs Endorsed as WiFi Hotspots and Autoconnect Functionality Proliferate

“WiFi footprint” is a simple term for a complex issue: the exploding pace of WiFi hotspot creation is not abating and soon a roamable, global alternative network will become our reality.

In a world seemingly saturated in WiFi, the notion of autoconnecting to these networks might seem appealing. However, whether using a laptop or mobile device, security threats remain a constant.

Experian Survey: We Understand WiFi Dangers but Don’t Protect Ourselves from Identity Theft

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, and in part to raise public awareness of the dangers of identity theft, Experian, a global information services company, has published a new survey regarding U.S. attitudes toward this serious problem. Check out the results — including why so many people still fail to take actions to protect themselves online.

Are Phone Calls Over WiFi Hotspots Safe from Hackers?

You might have heard that the new iPhone 6 supports making phone calls over WiFi networks. Using WiFi networks to make calls is the next big thing for mobile phones.

But how safe is it to make phone calls using public WiFi hotspots? Are your calls being encrypted? And should you take any steps to protect yourself from WiFi hackers? Read on to find out more.

How Hackers Protect Themselves When Using Public WiFi

Every year, thousands of hackers and security experts descend on Las Vegas for two of the world’s largest annual hacker conventions: Defcon and Black Hat. Security researchers present their latest findings and security exploits.

Keep reading to find out what types of hacking they are doing at these events and ways to protect yourself!

The Rise of the Evil Twin: How a Personal VPN Can Strike Back

We applaud Tech Republic for explaining what we’ve been educating about for years: “Public hotspots all have one thing in common; they are open networks that are vulnerable to attacks and security breaches. Most, if not all, public hotspots do not encrypt data, allowing passwords, email messages, and other information to be intercepted by nefarious types.”

Keep reading to see what else their article suggests — as well as our suggestions for avoiding evil-twin hotspots, dodging hackers, and protecting your identity.

Infographic: Protecting Yourself and Your Mobile Device

While most people secure their laptops with the latest security updates, there’s still a large segment of society who seems to think security issues do not affect their mobile phones.
An infographic designed by a company called Crowd Control HQ aims to protect everyone’s mobile device — but they forgot one very important security tip!

Keep reading to learn more.

OpenSignal’s U.S. WiFi Study Looks at Speed, But Not Network Security

OpenSignal is a small startup with a very interesting mission: they are creating a database of WiFi access points around the world and are hoping to become the global authority on wireless networks. Their website contains analysis of all of the data they have collected, including the WiFi signal strength of all access points in a given area.

How do they do it?

Study Shows Airline Passengers Are Demanding In-Flight WiFi

A new survey has found that airline passengers are now viewing WiFi as a necessity — not an optional perk. Consider that nearly 9 in 10 (89%) would give up beverage service and bathroom access for high-speed WiFi (even though in-flight WiFi is just like any other public WiFi: completely open and insecure). Keep reading for other surprising findings from the study.

Should You Use ‘Free’ WiFi Networks at Sporting Events?

In this day and age this is the stadium WiFi is the new standard. Because what fun is it to be at a sporting event if you can’t post pictures on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram?

But what you are giving up in exchange for access to so-called “free” WiFi? And who has access to your data as a result of being online at sporting events?

Google: Consumers Not Entitled to ‘Windfall’ Compensation In WiFi Snooping Lawsuit

Remember the brouhaha over Google’s Street View cars collecting personally identifiable information (including emails and Internet browsing activity) from WiFi networks that weren’t password-protected? The U.S. government intervened (the Federal Communications Commission even fined the search giant $25,000 in 2012 for refusing to cooperate with the investigation).

But did you know that Google also ended up in a class-action lawsuit?