Starbucks and AT&T Think You Should Be Using a VPN

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Something very interesting just happened recently with Starbucks that you may have missed.

If you use one of their free wifi networks at their coffee shops that AT&T provides, you have to agree to their Terms and Conditions. Like most of us, you probably didn’t read them. But if you did, you may have noticed something new.

Buried in these Terms and Conditions is the following sentence:

“If you have a VPN, AT&T recommends that you connect through it for optimum security.”

Normally, wifi hotspots have Terms of Services that basically say that you are accessing an insecure network and they are not liable to any damages you incur from using their network and leave it at that. We’ve even created a whole page on our blog that highlights these statements: https://www.privatewifi.com/category/privatei/the-fine-print/.

But now the tide seems to be turning as more and more people have recognized the need to protect themselves from the risks inherent to every public wifi network. It’s no longer acceptable just to point out that a public wifi network user is assuming all the risks; it’s good business to help users understand what they have to do to protect themselves from hackers.

Why This Is Good News

This is very good news because Starbucks is doing their customers a service by pointing out that only a VPN like PRIVATE WiFi can fully protect them while using public wifi hotspots.

This is a good thing to keep in mind the next time you login to your local Starbucks’ wifi network — or at any public wireless hotspot!

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Kent Lawson

Kent Lawson is the CEO & Chairman of Private Communications Corporation and creator of its flagship software PRIVATE WiFi. He combined his extensive business and technical experience to develop PRIVATE WiFi in 2010. The software is an easy-to-use Virtual Private Network (VPN) that protects your sensitive personal information whenever you’re connected to a public WiFi network. Follow Kent on Twitter: @KentLawson.