The Private WiFi Blog Blog

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Internet Security In a WikiLeaks Age

In this interview on The Huffington Post, a security adviser warns that “large-scale attacks on individual citizens, exploiting their online lives through bank accounts, social networking, and professional networks” could aim to “disrupt our connected lives.”

hacker

Is the Web Becoming Less Secure?

Check out this video and related article from PBS NewsHour, which reflects on the vulnerability of online information and the danger of further cyberattacks, especially in light of the recent hacking on Gawker.

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Public Wifi Tempts by Land and Rail

In attempts to stay competitive with the airline industry, train service and bus companies are going high-tech, installing more electrical plugs to allow riders to charge devices and unveiling free WiFi from coast to coast. But are you being careful about protecting yourself on the road?

Online Privacy: Good Guys and Bad Guys, Part 2

This is the second in a two-part series on the issues of personal online privacy. In Part 2, CEO Kent Lawson discusses the ethics behind Firesheep, a controversial download developed by Seattle-based programmer Eric Butler.

In Plain English: A Review of Google’s Privacy Policy

What does Google know? If you say everything under the sun, well, you are absolutely correct. Far scarier is the fact that Google also knows all about YOU! But have you ever read its privacy policy? Read on to learn, in plain English, just what the Google privacy policy means for you.

hacker

Wifi Hacking: Downloads to Defend Against Firesheep

Thanks to Firesheep, even novice hackers without any special skills –- you, your grandmother, your 10-year-old nephew — can spy on anyone’s Internet activity in a WiFi hotspot. That means your activities on sites lacking proper encryption — including Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, and FourSquare — are at risk.

data protection

Online Privacy: Good Guys and Bad Guys, Part 1

This is the first in a two-part series on the issues of personal privacy on the web. In Part 1, CEO Kent Lawson commends the Wall Street Journal for being a “good guy” — a solid media outlet committed to investigating the ways that businesses use our personal information, sometimes in shocking ways.