Data Breaches Continue to Happen At Banks, Colleges, and Beyond

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October may be National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, but that doesn’t  mean cyber-crime is taking a vacation. Here are just some of the major data breaches — including users’ Social Security numbers and dates of birth — that have been reported in October:

TD Bank

About 260,000 TD Bank customers from Maine to Florida were just alerted that their personal information was exposed during a recent data breach after unencrypted backup data tapes were misplaced in transport in March.

The tapes allegedly contained personal information, including account information and Social Security numbers.

TD Bank, which has about eight million customers, is offering the affected bankers free credit monitoring and identity theft protection.

Northwest Florida State College

An internal review revealed a hack of Northwest College servers between May 21, 2012-September 24, 2012. More than 3,000 employees, 76,000 Northwest College student records, and 200,000 students eligible for Bright Future scholarships in 2005-06 and 2006-07 were affected. Bright Future scholarship data included names, Social Security numbers, dates of birth, ethnicity, and genders.

Current and former employees that have used direct deposit anytime since 2002 may have had some information exposed. At least 50 employees had enough information in the folder to be at risk for identity theft.

UNC Chapel Hill Students

In North Carolina, a licensed clinical social worked accidentally attached confidential client information to an email that was forwarded to town council colleagues. The email was forwarded a second time to a public account, and consequently, the information was publicly available for a week.

Many of the social worker’s affected clients were University of North Carolina students. Names, Social Security numbers, clinical notes about client mental health, payment amounts, and insurance forms were exposed.

City of Burlington, Washington

A hacker allegedly stole $400,000 in city funds out of a Bank of America account last week, and city employees may have had their direct deposit bank account information compromised.

The Burlington theft came just days after security firm RSA warned of cybercriminals plotting a massive campaign to steal money from the online accounts of thousands of consumers at 30 or more major U.S. banks.

 

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Elaine Rigoli

Elaine Rigoli is PRIVATE WiFi's manager of digital content strategy.