Author: Kent Lawson

wifi safety

Ask the Expert: Am I Safe Using My Laptop in My Hotel Room?

You think you’re safe within the walls of your hotel room, but the minute you log on to the Internet you are potentially exposing yourself to privacy violations, identity theft, and a host of other cybercrimes you can’t even see happening. In this latest monthly installment of Ask the Expert, CEO Kent Lawson focuses on staying safe when you’re browsing online in your hotel room and the real reasons why a hotel cable connection is no safer than its WiFi connection. Ultimately, he says, the only way to protect yourself in hotels, whether using WiFi or a cable connection, is to use a virtual private network.

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Information Security: Who’s Looking Over Your Shoulder?

Have you been in an airport lately? While some people travel for leisure to escape always being “connected”, there are others who find it necessary to stay in touch. Here are some recommendations for keeping your personal information safe while on the road.

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Ask the Expert: What You Should Know About Google’s Privacy Policies

Google’s new privacy policy changes have many privacy advocates up in arms. It begs the question: does our personal information belong to us or the corporations that collect it? Instead of being forced to adhere to these data collection rules in order to use a popular product, shouldn’t we insist that companies give us the option to allow or deny them permission to track and store our personal information? What happens if hackers get ahold of this information?

Read on for more information about Google’s new privacy policies.

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Privacy on Facebook Takes Two Huge Hits

If you care about Facebook using your personal information in their advertisements, and want to opt out, check out this article. It explains a few new worries with the social media giant, including its “social ads” program.

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Ask the Expert: Can a VPN Protect You From Government Surveillance?

The NSA story about how the government is spying on us is currently dominating the news cycle.

Is this the turning point when the general public begins to take their online security seriously? Click to find out what the government knows about you and how they got the information. Then learn what you can do to protect yourself.

 

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FTC Says Hotel WiFi is Dangerous

Recently, the FTC posted an article on their website stating that hotel WiFi is dangerous and that users should not assume that just because they pay for Internet access that their connection is secure.

We couldn’t agree more. In fact, I have been stating this fact since we launched PRIVATE WiFi nearly five years ago.  This is an important topic because hotel traveler’s rank WiFi access at hotels as the number one amenity that they look for when booking hotel rooms.

The Three Legs of Protection: Antivirus Software, Firewalls, and VPNs

We’ve all heard about antivirus software and firewalls. But we probably don’t know as much about the third leg of computer protection: a VPN, or virtual private network. In his latest article, company CEO Kent Lawson says we do this at our peril, because the damage we can suffer from not using a VPN may far outweigh the risks of the other two combined. After the large-scale hack attacks over the past few years, VPNs are now earning their spot as the third security leg that is vital to every-day computer security.

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Managing BYOD Security Threats: VPNs Mitigate The Risks

It’s clear that the era of BYOD is here to stay. Workers are no longer confined to an office desk and computer, and instead are able to do work from anywhere: home, their local coffee shop, and while taking public transportation. The proliferation of public wireless networks has made this possible, and while this has freed employees up to do work from nearly everywhere, it also has introduced many security challenges.

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The Rise of the Evil Twin: How a Personal VPN Can Strike Back

We applaud Tech Republic for explaining what we’ve been educating about for years: “Public hotspots all have one thing in common; they are open networks that are vulnerable to attacks and security breaches. Most, if not all, public hotspots do not encrypt data, allowing passwords, email messages, and other information to be intercepted by nefarious types.”

Keep reading to see what else their article suggests — as well as our suggestions for avoiding evil-twin hotspots, dodging hackers, and protecting your identity.