Author: Jan Legnitto

Don’t Get Hacked At CES

It’s that time of year again – when more than 150,000 gadget geeks, techies and businesses from around the world descend on Las Vegas for the mother of all trade shows – the International Consumer Electronics Show. With over 3,200 exhibitors previewing and showcasing their high tech products, CES is the perfect place for tech enthusiasts to network. So you’d think it would be safe for attendees to connect their laptops and mobile devices to the event’s public WiFi hotspot.  But you’d be wrong. Like most big events, CES can be a hot spot for hackers.  If you’re going to be there, make sure you don’t become a target.

What the Open Wireless Movement Means for Your Wireless Security

Imagine a world where your smart devices could automatically join dozens of free open wireless networks – and those networks belonged to total strangers. Consumers who want to participate would need to set up openwireless.org as the network name — and those who want to connect to those networks need to search for that name. That’s the bold vision of the Open Wireless Movement, a joint project of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla, Fight for the Future, and other groups.

True Story: I Was Hacked on Home WiFi

Do you think your home wireless network is secure? That’s what Barb Angelova thought, until she got the scare of her life. What happened to Barb isn’t unusual. What’s more, it should be a wakeup call for anyone who uses home WiFi.

Giving Out Your Social Security Number Online: Just Say No

Have you ever thought about how many times you’ve given out your Social Security number without thinking about the consequences? Or why so many organizations say they need it? If you haven’t, you’re not alone. Social Security numbers are the most important piece of information a cybercriminal needs to commit identity theft. Yet many consumers don’t worry about handing over their most valuable identity asset until it’s too late.

Why You Should Worry About Wearable Tech and Wireless Security

They track our movements, monitor our health, and record where we’ve been and what we’ve seen.  They’re wearable computing devices – one of the hottest trends in tech today. According to a 2013 Nielsen survey, 15% of U.S. consumers already own and use some form of wearables – everything from smart watches and fitness bands to glasses that record video.

So before you don that wearable tech, read on and consider how your data could be exploited.

Child Porn Cases Highlight the Dangers of Unsecure Home WiFi

When you think about the danger of cyber criminals invading your home WiFi network, what’s your biggest fear? If you’re like most consumers, it’s likely to be having your sensitive information stolen and used to commit identity fraud.

Failing to secure your home WiFi connection could lead to your home network being hijacked and used to commit many kinds of crimes — read what’s happened to innocent people just like you.

New York City’s Payphone Hotspots Could Be a Payday for Hackers

In the age of smartphones, why would anyone want to use an outdated New York City payphone? To connect to a free WiFi hotspot, of course!  That’s what NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio is counting on as he embarks on a bold plan to create one of the largest public WiFi networks in the country. Politicians and public interest and trade groups are jumping on the payphone hotspot bandwagon. But wait a minute! Is anybody thinking about security, which is non-existent at WiFi hotspots?

That Shared Family Tablet Could End Up Costing You Plenty

Consumers love their tablets. Their big touch screens and extreme portability make them ideal for browsing, apps, email, and a host of other online activities. So it’s not surprising that over half of users say tablets are their favorite device, according to Adobe data.

Unfortunately, tablets are also the favorite device of identity thieves, who love to hack them.

Google Says Collecting Data From Unencrypted WiFi Networks Isn’t Illegal

Do you think it’s legal to collect data transmitted over unencrypted WiFi networks?  Google does. That’s why it has gone to the highest court in the land to get a final decision on one of the most hotly debated legal issues of our time. The stakes couldn’t be higher for Google and for WiFi users everywhere.

Piggybackers Use Senior’s Unsecure Home WiFi Network for an Online Joyride

No one expects to get a $600 bill for basic wireless Internet service. But according to CBC News, that’s exactly what happened to Darlene Davies of Chilliwack, British Columbia. Davies normally pays $60 a month to use Rogers unsecured Rocket hub WiFi hotspot access point at home. So she was shocked when her monthly bill arrived and it was for 10 times that amount.

Davies said she didn’t know she had to add password protection to secure her home WiFi network. That left the door wide open for piggybackers to hop on her WiFi and rack up a huge bill.

In a Multi-device World, Expect More Risks to Your Online Security

Humanity reached an important mobile milestone this year. There are now more mobile devices than people on the planet.  Not surprisingly, part of what’s feeding the mobile frenzy is the growing number of consumers who are multi-device owners. More than 60% of online adults use at least two devices every day, according to a new study by GfK commissioned by Facebook. And more than 40% of those surveyed sometimes start an activity on one device but finish it on another. While that can make completing online tasks a lot more convenient, it can also expose your sensitive information to more online security risks. Each mobile device gives cybercriminals another access point they can exploit.