Monthly Archive: September 2014

Canadian Transit Systems to Get Free WiFi

You would think Canadians would be a little wary of using public WiFi after a spy agency was accused of using airport WiFi networks to track travelers. But Canadian cities are rapidly installing free public WiFi on their transit systems, including three Metro Vancouver buses that began offering free WiFi earlier this month. Keep reading to find out where else this convenience is expanding (and how to protect your online privacy!).

Are Phone Calls Over WiFi Hotspots Safe from Hackers?

You might have heard that the new iPhone 6 supports making phone calls over WiFi networks. Using WiFi networks to make calls is the next big thing for mobile phones.

But how safe is it to make phone calls using public WiFi hotspots? Are your calls being encrypted? And should you take any steps to protect yourself from WiFi hackers? Read on to find out more.

How Hackers Protect Themselves When Using Public WiFi

Every year, thousands of hackers and security experts descend on Las Vegas for two of the world’s largest annual hacker conventions: Defcon and Black Hat. Security researchers present their latest findings and security exploits.

Keep reading to find out what types of hacking they are doing at these events and ways to protect yourself!

The Rise of the Evil Twin: How a Personal VPN Can Strike Back

We applaud Tech Republic for explaining what we’ve been educating about for years: “Public hotspots all have one thing in common; they are open networks that are vulnerable to attacks and security breaches. Most, if not all, public hotspots do not encrypt data, allowing passwords, email messages, and other information to be intercepted by nefarious types.”

Keep reading to see what else their article suggests — as well as our suggestions for avoiding evil-twin hotspots, dodging hackers, and protecting your identity.

Infographic: Protecting Yourself and Your Mobile Device

While most people secure their laptops with the latest security updates, there’s still a large segment of society who seems to think security issues do not affect their mobile phones.
An infographic designed by a company called Crowd Control HQ aims to protect everyone’s mobile device — but they forgot one very important security tip!

Keep reading to learn more.

Will WiFi Replace Cable and Fiber Networks?

In a recent blog post, we mentioned that the next generation of WiFi technology will be much faster, and that by 2018, worldwide WiFi traffic will overtake wired traffic for the first time ever.

Now see how one Silicon Valley company plans to bring high-speed WiFi networks to underdeveloped parts of the U.S. as well as developing countries.

OpenSignal’s U.S. WiFi Study Looks at Speed, But Not Network Security

OpenSignal is a small startup with a very interesting mission: they are creating a database of WiFi access points around the world and are hoping to become the global authority on wireless networks. Their website contains analysis of all of the data they have collected, including the WiFi signal strength of all access points in a given area.

How do they do it?

Home Depot Hit by Data Thieves, Similar to Target Breach

Have you heard about the major Home Depot attack? Some say it could be one of the largest data breaches in history, even larger than the Target data breach last year. It speaks to a lack of awareness of security protocols — and has identity theft experts very worried.

Android Apps Susceptible to Man-in-the-Middle Attacks

With a man-in-the-middle attack, your app thinks it is communicating with the app’s web server, but in fact, all of your personal information is being sent directly to the hacker’s computer. Keep reading for details on the two kinds of SSL vulnerabilities that FireEye found in some of the most popular Android apps — and how to protect yourself today.

Study Shows Airline Passengers Are Demanding In-Flight WiFi

A new survey has found that airline passengers are now viewing WiFi as a necessity — not an optional perk. Consider that nearly 9 in 10 (89%) would give up beverage service and bathroom access for high-speed WiFi (even though in-flight WiFi is just like any other public WiFi: completely open and insecure). Keep reading for other surprising findings from the study.

Should You Use ‘Free’ WiFi Networks at Sporting Events?

In this day and age this is the stadium WiFi is the new standard. Because what fun is it to be at a sporting event if you can’t post pictures on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram?

But what you are giving up in exchange for access to so-called “free” WiFi? And who has access to your data as a result of being online at sporting events?